Pop quiz!

An interesting item from stackoverflow via /r/javascript!

Why does parseInt(1/0, 18) == NaN, but parseInt(1/0, 19) == 18 and parseInt(1/0, 25) == 185011843?

Javascript apparently has the division by zero problem solved, due to (x > 0)/0 being equal to Infinity, an object (constant?) in JS in the same vein as NaN. It interacts with NaN as well, in that Infinity - Infinity or Infinity / Infinity == NaN, but Infinity + Infinity or Infinity * Infinity == Infinity. Also there’s -Infinity, just for fun.

When parseInt()ing the value infinity, internally it must run .toString() to get the value which returns "Infinity". Base 19 has the numbers 0-9 and then goes on to the letters a-i (there’s a table in the stackoverflow article) of which the first letter of "Infinity" matches, returning 18, when you up the base to 25, all the letters up to n are parsed turning the ‘number’ "Infinity" into 185011843. Interestingly that also means that parseInt(Infinity/Infinity, 25) == 14648!

Mousetrap – excellent keyboard shortcuts

Just discovered a great little library called mousetrap.

It enables you to have complex, chained if required, keyboard events bound in a very simple, powerful way with no reliance on an underlying library.

Example usage:

Find out more, test and download it here, or access the git repository here.